4 Reasons You Need to Get Involved with the Chamber Today

4 Reasons You Need to Get Involved with the Chamber Today

Businesses join the chamber of commerce for several reasons. Years ago, it may have been expected; just something you did when you opened a business and wanted to be in good standing in the community.

But these days it’s more likely a business joins because there is a direct advantage to them personally. Maybe they wanted a ribbon-cutting or need the advocacy or wanted a marketing opportunity that membership allowed them.

Yes, there are many reasons to join the chamber and tons of benefits your business can receive from membership. But aside from simply writing a check and receiving a set of benefits, there are reasons why you should become personally involved with the local chamber of commerce.

Plus, the chamber extends its benefits to all of your employees so you can use chamber membership benefits as employee benefits. Share this with them as well.

4 Reasons to Get Involved with the Chamber

Let’s place the advocacy, marketing, advertising, and public relations benefits of chamber membership on the back burner. This article is about what the chamber can do for you and your employees specifically, not the business. Yes, the chamber can bring more attention to your business, which can create more sales opportunities, but these benefits and this personal involvement are things that can help you outside of the business.

Education Opportunities

The chamber has a number of education opportunities where you and your employees can learn about important matters for free (or at a very low cost). Chamber webinar topics may include things like diversity, how to excel in social media and economic interests in your area. They can help you become a more well-rounded professional, change careers, or get up-to-date on important topics in the community.

Leadership Experience

The chamber offers a lot of opportunities to volunteer for different committees or events. You may find a volunteer position in a subject that interests you like women leaders, diversity, workforce development, or marketing. Not only can these volunteer positions be added to your resume, but volunteering could also help you meet people with similar interests and help you grow your professional network. Speaking of…

Networking

Getting involved with the chamber can help you meet more people and grow your professional network and make friendships. Even in communities where social gatherings are still mostly virtual, chambers have networking sessions to help you stay connected.

Business Expansion and Hidden Opportunities

As you grow your network, you may learn of additional business possibilities that you could add to your business or you could use to launch a new one. You

 may learn of seed money, grants, SBA funding, or private opportunities.

Often business deals get made before anything is formally published or requested. Being personally involved in the chamber may help you be a part of those types of discussions and make you aware of opportunities before they become public.

The same may be true of the hidden job market. A contact may tell you they’re looking for someone before posting it on a job site, giving you the advantage.

Chamber benefits for your business are amazing. They can really help you increase your number of customers and get your name out there. But those aren’t the only benefits. If you get involved individually, there are many benefits to your professional growth and career. Plus, those benefits can be given to all of your employees too. That can be a real selling point for someone looking for great company culture.

Guest article provided by: Christina R. Metcalf (formerly Green) is a marketer who enjoys using the power of story and refuses to believe meaningful copy can be written by bots. She helps chamber and small business professionals find the right words when they don’t have the time or interest to do so. 

EARLY VOTING HAS BEGUN IN THE 2021 OHIO PRIMARY ELECTION

 
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, April 6, 2021
 
MEDIA CONTACT
Maggie Sheehan | (301) 997-6107
 
EARLY VOTING HAS BEGUN IN THE
2021 OHIO PRIMARY ELECTION
Ohio is a National Leader in Early Voting Opportunities
 
COLUMBUS – Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is reminding voters that early voting starts today in the 2021 Primary Election. Ohio has some of the most voter-friendly, accessible early voting opportunities in the nation. With four weeks of early in-person voting, Ohio outpaces the early voting period national average by 47.3%. Additionally, Ohio is one of just 20 states that allow early voting on Saturdays and one of just five that has statewide early voting on a Sunday.
 
“Our elections have been so successful because over time we’ve developed a strong, secure, and accessible system that’s empowered voters with extensive opportunities to make their voice heard,” said LaRose. “This primary season is just as important as any other election, and with elections happening across 60 counties, it’s going to have a big impact in communities across Ohio.”
 
The list of issues on the ballot can be found by clicking here. This list does not include local races for elected office as those are tracked only by county boards of elections.
 
The early voting schedule can be found below, or by clicking here
 
Ohioans can find their early voting location by visiting their county board of elections by clicking here.
 
Additionally, today absentee ballots may begin being sent to those who have requested one. Absentee voting in Ohio is time-tested and has strong security checks in place. Ohioans have utilized absentee voting for nearly two decades, and that has allowed Ohio to put in place both the laws and processes necessary to make absentee voting secure against fraud.
 
  • Voter identification and signature are checked TWICE during the process
  • Voter list maintenance allows for accurate voter rolls
  • Ballot harvesting is against the law in Ohio
  • Voters able to track their ballot on VoteOhio.gov/Track
 
These requirements and processes, as well as strict laws against voter fraud, have made absentee voting secure in Ohio and instances of voter fraud exceedingly rare.
 
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25 Marketing Questions You Need to Ask Yourself Today

25 Marketing Questions You Need to Ask Yourself Today

Hope seems to be a big word these days. It’s taken the place of pivot. People are hopeful about recovery. People are hopeful about things returning to normal in the foreseeable future. And people are hopeful they can soon travel and visit loved ones they haven’t seen for a while.

If recovery is right around the corner, now is the ideal time to revisit your marketing strategy and plan. Making critical changes now can bring you into alignment to make the most of recovery. Plus, it’s possible the needs and desires of your target audience have changed.

Asking yourself the following questions about your business and marketing can help ensure that you have the data and information you need to make the most of the looming recovery.

  1. Who is your ideal customer? Has it changed with COVID?
  2. What is your marketing goal in 2021? What are your objectives/tactics for getting there? How will you measure success or how will you know when you’ve reached that goal?
  3. What is your brand tone? Try this exercise: “We are ____ but not ____.” For example, we are informative but not boring.
  4. What is your reputation in your industry and your community? What do people think of when they think of your brand/product/service?
  5. Where is your target audience on social media (Facebook, Insta, etc.)? Are they still easily reached where you thought they were?
  6. Are people still reading your blog?
  7. What customer problem do you solve?
  8. Do you sell through fear, inspiration, or solving a problem? Does that course of action still work for you?
  9. What is the open rate on your newsletter? Has that changed with the pandemic?
  10. Are you using a tracker that shows you where people are clicking on your website and/or newsletter? If yes, where are they clicking and where aren’t they clicking? What does that tell you about their needs?
  11. Do you have an email list?
  12. What data are you currently tracking and what are you doing with it?
  13. What kind of content do your customers like best/have the most interaction with?
  14. How many active followers do you have on each social media platform you participate on? How has that changed with COVID?
  15. Do your customers enjoy a type of content you are not providing such as podcasts or videos?
  16. What story are you telling?
  17. How much does your average customer cost?
  18. What are your customer retention strategies and how are you implementing them?
  19. How has your product or service evolved over the past year? How has your marketing message changed? Does it need to?
  20. What’s your call to action and does it fit where it is used? For instance, you don’t invite someone to buy when they’re just getting to know you on the About Us page of your website. Speaking of…
  21. What are you doing to help people get to know, like, and trust you?
  22. What part of your business is off-putting or scary for first-time buyers? What can you do to make it less so? For instance, gyms may be intimidating for the out-of-shape first timers. How can you reach them and be more inviting? A get-fit challenge is a solution to that because participants would know they’d be with other newbies.
  23. Do you have a defined success metric for every campaign you implement?
  24. In what area(s) is your competition falling short? In what areas are they strongest? How do you compare?
  25. How many referrals (and/or reviews) are you getting? What vehicle/strategy are you using to get more?

These questions are easily answered but implementing the answers/solutions takes more planning. It’s a lot of work now but once you put it in, you’ll be glad you did.

Christina R. Metcalf (formerly Green) is a marketer who enjoys using the power of story and refuses to believe meaningful copy can be written by bots. She helps chamber and small business professionals find the right words when they don’t have the time or interest to do so. 

Christina hates exclamation points and loves road trips. Say hi on Twitter or reach out on Facebook.

6 Signs of a Healthy Business

6 Signs of a Healthy Business

Many of us have spent this year concerned about the health of our businesses or those in the community. Ultimately, a healthy business has a good balance sheet. It has more coming in than it does going out. But that is not the only indicator of business health.

In today’s world, where a quick decision from a politician can radically affect your business overnight, it’s important to know the early indicators of business peril. This of these things as your business’ “canary in the coal mine.”

Signs Your Business Is Healthy (before you see it on the books)

Before you see any issues in the balance sheet, you can spot a healthy business in these areas:

  1. Referrals. While it’s never easy to get people to refer you even when they love you, a healthy business harnesses the power of the referral and makes it easy for happy customers to bring in more happy customers.
  2. Reviews. Just like referrals, reviews are the signature of a healthy, well-loved business. But they don’t happen automatically. A healthy business asks for them, makes it easy to give them, and repurposes them in their marketing collateral.
  3. Promotes from within and trains accordingly. A healthy business promotes from within with clear pathways to additional challenges even when the business is small enough not to have additional levels to climb. It recognizes employees who are committed to the business, doing a great job, and those that require additional challenges or training.
  4. Looks for needs. If your business moves in another direction, opens a new market, or branches out, you may not be able to promote from within. A healthy business is clear about what each employee’s strengths are and what they may need to obtain from outside whether that be from an additional hire, vendor, or partner.
  5. Builds loyalty outside of sales. Loyalty is not owned by the sales department. Loyalty is built by customer service and marketing. A healthy company looks for ways to keep customers engaged and feeling like they are part of the brand. It creates enjoyable experiences for customers at each touchpoint whether they are calling to complain, buy, or simply spend time on social media.
  6. Remains agile. This one is certainly a lesson learned in 2020. A healthy business must be ready to align its offerings and services with those of their loyal customers and the larger market. Small businesses may not have had a lot of operating capital when the pandemic hit but they did retain the ability to move quickly and that helped a lot of them stay in the black.

Is your business healthy outside of the balance sheet? Go through this list and ask yourself how many of these qualities your business meets. If you’re missing a few, you may want to see how quickly you can add them. After all, they are a good indicator of business health long before you begin to see signs of trouble in the balance sheets or books.

 

Christina R. Metcalf (formerly Green) is a marketer who enjoys using the power of story and refuses to believe meaningful copy can be written by bots. She helps chamber and small business professionals find the right words when they don’t have the time or interest to do so. 

Christina hates exclamation points and loves road trips. Say hi on Twitter or reach out on Facebook.

BUSINESS RESOURCES for Covid-19

Coronavirus relief options

SBA offers several different relief options to help businesses, nonprofits, and faith-based organizations recover from the impacts of COVID-19. You can view all options or skip to a specific program below.

In order to reach the smallest businesses, SBA will offer Paycheck Protection Program loans to businesses with 20 or less employees and sole proprietors only from Wednesday, February 24 through Wednesday, March 10, 2021. President Biden has also announced additional program changes to make access to PPP loans more equitable.

SBA is currently offering the following funding options:

SBA is preparing to offer:

SBA is contacting eligible businesses regarding:

SBA previously offered the following funding options:

  • EIDL Advance (No longer available)

Governor DeWine Announces CARES Act Funding to Support Small Businesses, Nonprofits, and Ohioans Impacted by COVID-19

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 23, 2020

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today announced that the administration, in partnership with the General Assembly, is developing a package of more than $419.5 million CARES Act funding to help Ohioans. This package includes funding for small businesses, restaurants and bars, hospitals, higher education, arts, nonprofits, and low-income Ohioans impacted financially by the pandemic

READ MORE HERE


Business Grants, Loans and Tax Credits

Business Bonds, Grants, Loans, and Tax Credits

The Ohio Development Services Agency has a variety of bonds, grants, loans and tax credits that can assist Ohio companies as they grow and create jobs in Ohio. More information click HERE.


Summary of Governor DeWine’s Address | February 18, 2021

 

COVID-19 Update: Vaccine Maintenance Program, Nursing Home Visitation, Phase 1B Medical Conditions

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

WEATHER DELAYS

As a result of continued bad weather, vaccine shipments in Ohio and across the country continue to be delayed. Ohioans with vaccine appointments this week should confirm that their appointment has not been canceled before leaving home.

Because of these weather delays, it is expected that providers will give vaccinations over the weekend as shipments arrive.

VACCINE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

This morning, Ohio launched its COVID-19 Vaccine Maintenance Program for nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Each month, facilities can host a vaccine clinic for residents and staff if there is the need for vaccinations. The program ensures that vaccinations in long-term care facilities continue for new residents and staff or current residents and staff who have now decided to be vaccinated. 

NURSING HOME VISITATION

Governor DeWine announced that he has assembled a team of doctors and nurses to develop a plan for safe nursing home visitation. Members of the team are experts in infectious disease control, skilled nursing, and other types of long-term care settings.

Ohio’s existing visitation order does allow compassionate care visits. Examples of compassionate care situations could include:

  • A resident who was living with their family before recently being admitted to a home is struggling with the change in environment and lack of physical family support.
  • A resident who needs cueing and encouragement with eating or drinking, previously provided by family or caregiver(s), is experiencing weight loss or dehydration.
  • A resident, who used to talk and interact with others, is experiencing emotional distress, seldom speaking, or crying more frequently.

The Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman is available to assist citizens with questions about compassionate care visits. The office can be reached at OhioOmbudsman@age.ohio.gov or 1-800-282-1206. 

PHASE 1B MEDICAL CONDITIONS

This week, vaccine eligibility opened up to Ohioans born with the medical conditions outlined below, or those who were diagnosed in early childhood whose conditions continued into adulthood. Following anecdotal reports of individuals with these conditions being denied vaccination appointments, particularly those with cystic fibrosis, Governor DeWine stressed that vaccine providers should vaccinate those of any age with any of the following conditions. 

Ohio's vaccination program garphic

COVID-19 Resource Guide

As Ohio communities continue to face the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important that they have the
resources they need to help keep residents safe.

Please use this guide as a tool as we continue to help one another and persevere until we are on the other side of this crisis.  We are all in this together, Ohio.

Click HERE to view the “COVID-19 Resource Guide.”

CDC’s Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-business-response.html.

COVID-19 Information for Businesses: https://www.tpchd.org/healthy-people/diseases/covid-19-information-for- businesses.


Coronavirus and Unemployment Insurance Benefits
 
Ohioans can apply for unemployment benefits online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at unemployment.ohio.gov. It is also possible to file by phone at 877-644-6562 or TTY at 888- 642-8203, Monday through Friday 7 am to 7 pm and 9 am to 1 pm on Saturdays. Employers with questions should email UCTech@jfs.ohio.gov. 
Read more 
jfs.ohio.gov 


Resources for Local Health Districts and Providers  
Resources for Local Health Districts and Providers – COVID-19 The Ohio Department of Health (ODH), in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is closely monitoring coronavirus disease 2019, first identified in… 
 
Read more 
odh.ohio.gov 

If your agency/organization needs support, please remember there are two ways to request support:

  1. For supply needs, please email eoc@allencountyohio.com .
  2. In order to apply for COVID-19 funds, please fill out the following form: https://forms.gle/EQV9dAA89Ms3ckse9 .  
  3. The personal protective equipment (PPE) shortage in Ohio remains severe. Governor DeWine made a plea to healthcare workers using N95 masks to send them to Battelle which can sterilize up to 160,000 masks each day, making them reusable up to 20 times. Hospitals should contact battelle.org to arrange for mask sterilization.

United Way

COVID Resources

CDC Situation Reports

WHO Situation Reports

Allen County Public Health


Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation

Ohio employers urged to cash dividend checks

NEWS RELEASE

Jan. 13, 2021

$500 million in checks aimed at pandemic relief remain uncashed

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) urges Ohio employers to cash the checks BWC mailed them in December to mitigate the economic hardship brought by the COVID-19 pandemic.

As of Tuesday, 23,351 employers still had not cashed $513.7 million in checks BWC sent last month in its $5 billion dividend for nearly 180,000 private and public employers.

“We issued this dividend at Governor Mike DeWine’s request to help businesses stay open and keep people employed,” said BWC Interim Administrator/CEO John Logue. “We encourage employers to check their mail and start putting these dollars to use.”

BWC issued the dividend in mid-December via checks in the mail and credits to employer accounts. Made possible by strong investment returns, declining injury claims, and other cost savings, the dividend included $4.3 billion for

 private employers and $687 million for local government taxing districts, such as counties, cities, townships, and schools.

The dividend followed two others in 2020, one for $1.54 billion last spring and another for $1.34 billion in October, bringing total dividends for the year to nearly $8 billion.

The checks have a 90-day life before stale-dating. BWC will reissue checks after the stale date at the employer’s request, but the process delays employer access to these funds. Ultimately, if an employer fails to cash an original or reissued check, BWC will credit their account.

For frequently asked questions, visit this page on BWC’s website or call BWC at 1-800-644-6292.
BWC and COVID-19

For more information about COVID-19 as it relates to BWC, visit this Frequently Asked Questions page or email BWCCOVID19@bwc.state.oh.us.

For the latest on the pandemic as it relates to Ohio, visit the Ohio Department of Health website coronavirus.ohio.gov, or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH (1-833-427-5634).

 


OHIO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION WAIVER  

The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is modifying the process for haulers carrying heavy loads of essential goods. 

Generally, Ohio requires haulers with loads classified as “oversized” to seek advanced permission from ODOT before they are legally allowed to travel in the state.  

To assist in the state’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak, ODOT will modify the process for haulers carrying heavy or oversized loads of food, non-alcoholic beverages, medical supplies, cleaning products, and other household goods. 

Haulers carrying these essential goods can download and print the permit at transportation.ohio.gov. 


Ohio Manufactures COVID-19 Resources (for Manufacturers)

Ohio Public Private Partnership – Recently, the Federal Emergency Management Agency released the following information on how to consider addressing PPE needs in a non-healthcare setting. 

Read more here

 

 

Small Businesses Cannot Afford $15/hr Minimum Wage

Small Businesses Cannot Afford $15/hr Minimum Wage

Congress recently proposed increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour and eliminating the tipped wage. This proposal would more than double the federal minimum wage while small businesses are struggling to make it through the pandemic. 

Email your legislators and urge them to oppose the Raise the Wage Act of 2021.

Increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour and eliminating the tipped wage would hit small business owners particularly hard. NFIB Research Center estimates that this proposal will reduce employment by 1.6 million jobs by 2029. Businesses with fewer than 500 employees would absorb 900,000 of those job losses, 57% of all jobs lost.

Small businesses, unlike larger businesses, are less likely to have the cash reserves or profit margins to absorb the increase in labor costs. Small business owners must make the difficult decision to either increase the cost of their products, which in many cases is untenable, or reduce labor costs in the form of employees, employee hours, or other employee benefits. 

Businesses that currently pay a minimum of $15 per hour may feel pressure from employees to elevate their wages to make up the difference as they are accustomed to making more than the federal minimum.

Help Congress understand how a mandated $15 per hour minimum wage would impact your business, employees, and community. Many legislators have never worked for a small business—they don’t know the real-world impacts this legislation would have on their district/state and the businesses and employees they represent. Tell them.

Be the voice of small business and make your voice heard.

COMPOSE YOUR MESSAGE HERE

 

 

IRS warns against COVID-19 fraud; other financial schemes

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers to guard against tax fraud and other related financial scams related to COVID-19.

In the last few months, the IRS Criminal Investigation Division (CI) has seen a variety of Economic Impact Payment (EIP) scams and other financial schemes looking to take advantage of unsuspecting taxpayers. CI continues to work with law enforcement agencies domestically and abroad to educate taxpayers about these scams and investigate the criminals perpetrating them during this challenging time.

“Criminals seize on every opportunity to exploit bad situations, and this pandemic is no exception,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “The IRS is fully focused on protecting Americans while delivering Economic Impact Payments in record time. The pursuit of those who participate in COVID-19 related scams, intentionally abusing the programs intended to help millions of Americans during these uncertain times, will long remain a significant priority of both the IRS and IRS-CI.”

Criminals are continuing to use the COVID-19 Economic Impact Payments as cover for schemes to steal personal information and money. Scams related to COVID-19 are not limited to stealing EIPs from taxpayers, however. CI has already seen scams related to the organized selling of fake at-home test kits, offers to sell fake cures, vaccines, pills and advice on unproven treatments for COVID-19. Other scams purport to sell large quantities of medical supplies through the creation of fake shops, websites, social media accounts and email addresses where the criminal fails to deliver promised supplies after receiving funds.

“Criminals try to take advantage of our most vulnerable times and our most vulnerable populations. But because we have seen many of these criminals and schemes before, we know how to find them and we know how to expose them,” said Don Fort, Chief of IRS Criminal Investigation. “And because COVID-19 is a global problem, it requires a global solution. Not only are we leveraging our financial investigative expertise domestically, we are working hand-in-hand with our J5 partners on those COVID-19 cases that cross borders. There truly is no place for criminals to hide.”

Other COVID-19 related scams involve setting up fake charities soliciting donations for individuals, groups and areas affected by the disease. Some criminals are offering opportunities to invest early in companies working on a vaccine for the disease promising that the “company” will dramatically increase in value as a result. These promotions are often styled as “research reports,” make predictions of a specific “target price,” and relate to microcap stocks, or low-priced stocks issued by the smallest of companies with limited publicly available information.

Finally, CI has also seen a tremendous increase in phishing schemes utilizing emails, letters, texts and links. These phishing schemes are using keywords such as “Corona Virus,” “COVID-19,” and “Stimulus” in varying ways. These schemes are blasted to large numbers of people known by the bad actors in an effort to get personally identifying information or financial account information to include account numbers and passwords. Most of these new schemes are actively playing on the fear and unknown of the virus and the stimulus payments.

Coronavirus-related (COVID-19) scams should be reported to the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or submitted through the NCDF web Complaint Form. The NCDF is a national coordinating agency within the Department of Justice’s Criminal Division dedicated to improving the detection, prevention, investigation and prosecution of criminal conduct related to natural and man-made disasters and other emergencies, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19). Hotline staff will obtain information regarding your complaint, which will then be reviewed by law enforcement officials.

Taxpayers can also report fraud or theft of their Economic Impact Payments to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA). Reports can be made online. TIGTA investigates external attempts to corruptly interfere with federal tax administration, including IRS-related coronavirus scams.

Also, taxpayers can always report phishing attempts to the IRS. Those who receive unsolicited emails or social media attempts to gather information that appear to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), should forward it to phishing@irs.gov. Taxpayers are encouraged not to engage potential scammers online or on the phone.

Learn more by going to the Report Phishing and Online Scams page on IRS.gov. Official IRS information about the COVID-19 pandemic and economic impact payments can be found on the Coronavirus Tax Relief page on IRS.gov, which is updated frequently.

 

Read Press Release Here

Benefit coverage for the COVID-19 vaccine

Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC)

May 28, 2020

COLUMBUS – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced today the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) is deferring the due date for employers to pay their June, July, and August premium installments until Sept.1.

Governor DeWine said the deferral is designed to help employers focus resources on re-opening their businesses under his Responsible RestartOhio Plan, the state’s effort to restart the economy while keeping Ohioans safe amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
“By extending the premium due date, businesses can continue to focus on the safety and well-being of their employees and customers during this health pandemic,” said Governor DeWine. 

BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud noted the deferral is the second deadline extension given to employers since COVID-19 emerged in Ohio in March.

“We’ve said since the beginning of this pandemic we would do our best to relieve the financial pressures employers are facing in this unprecedented time,” said Administrator McCloud. “This is our latest step, and I’m grateful to Ohio’s employer community, our stakeholders, and our staff for putting us in a strong position to help.”

Among several actions to help the business community’s bottom line, BWC sent Ohio’s private and public employers nearly $1.6 billion in dividends in late April thanks to strong investment returns, declining injury claims, and other costs savings. The agency is also sending at least 2 million face coverings to employers and their workforce to weaken the spread of the coronavirus under its Protecting Ohio’s Workforce — We’ve Got You Covered plan.

For more on BWC as it relates to COVID-19, please visit bwc.ohio.gov or email us at BWCCOVID19@bwc.state.oh.us

For more on COVID-19, including prevention guidelines and its impact on Ohio, visit the Ohio Department of Health website coronavirus.ohio.gov.
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Media Contacts: 
Tony Gottschlich, 614-644-4940 or 614-296-1734, tony.gottschlich@bwc.state.oh.us
Kim Norris, 614-728-8045 or 614-361-0202, kimberly.norris@bwc.state.oh.us  
Established in 1912, the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation is the exclusive provider of workers’ compensation insurance in Ohio and serves 249,000 public and private employers. With 1,800 employees and assets of approximately $28 billion, BWC is the largest state-run insurance system in the United States. Our mission is to protect Ohio’s workers and employers through the prevention, care and management of workplace injuries and illnesses at fair rates. For more, visit www.bwc.ohio.gov.

If you would rather not receive future communications from Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, let us know by clicking here.
Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, WGB, 30 W. Spring St., Level 24, Columbus, OH 43215 United States

ALL CLASS OF 2020 DEVELOPS REGIONAL SURVEY TO ASSIST ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS

ALL Survey 2020

Allen Lima Leadership Class of 2020
Media Contact: Melissa Sponseller (419) 908-7788

Matthew Childers, ALL Executive Director

all@wcoil.com   (419) 204-8152

ALL CLASS OF 2020 DEVELOPS REGIONAL SURVEY TO ASSIST ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS

Lima, Ohio (September 4, 2020) 

The Allen Lima Leadership (ALL) Class of 2020 has accepted the challenge by Executive Director, Matt Childers to develop a project that will add value to the Greater Lima Community.  During the ten-month program, teams developed project ideas and presented those projects to a panel of judges in June. The winning project is the development of a community-wide survey to gather information related to livability in the Greater Lima Region. The class is working closely with the Lima/Allen County Chamber of Commerce and the Allen Economic Development Group to develop the best survey questions to offer the best data that will assist their strategic planning efforts.

The Regional Survey is made up of 15 questions and will take less than 5 minutes to complete. The survey will open on Friday, September 4, 2020, and will close on Friday, September 11, 2020. The survey will be sent to regional businesses, employees, students, and posted on various social media channels. The data collected will be analyzed to develop targeted growth campaigns for companies that represent economic value to all people in the Greater Lima Region.  The project coordinators are looking to receive a minimum of 1,000 responses to provide a 90% confidence rate of the data.

The Survey will also be linked on the following websites: Lima/Allen County Chamber, Allen Economic Development Group, The Lima News and Hometown Stations as well as through the ALL Facebook page.

The ALL Class of 2020 would like to invite the community to participate in this 15 question survey and share it with their friends and family, especially those that have moved away from Lima. The targeted audience is those born and raised in the Greater Lima Region, age range 18 to 35, those currently working in the Greater Lima Region, and those who live and work outside of the Greater Lima Region. Results will be presented at the class graduation scheduled on September 24, 2020, at the Civic Center.

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